Equine Rehab &Therapy
The Science of Bio-mechanics and Art of Feel
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FAQs

 Frequently Asked Questions
1. How can I tell if this work will help my horse?
2. Will this work hurt my horse?
3. Does this replace my Vet?
4. How long do treatments last?
5. What conditions can't this work help?
6. Why is this better than a regular chiropractor, or massage therapist or acupuncturist?
7. What if my horse won't tolerate being worked on?
8. Are there any guarantees?
9. My horse isn't injured, is there any point in having him/her worked on?
10. As a trainer, I can usually get my clients horses to do what I ask, why do I have any interest in bodywork?

1.  How can I tell if this work will help my horse?

The types of problems that respond best to bodywork are those related to pain from muscles or skeletal imbalances. After your vet does a lameness exam and doesn't find anything conclusive, problems of intermittent lameness, deteriorating performance times, changes in ability to perform patterns or jumps, inability to collect, one-sidedness i.e. difficulty taking particular leads, poor behavior, missed transitions, both up and down, dragging a limb, unusual head carriage or position, stiffness and repeated neck stretching are some of the issues that bodywork can help remedy.  Back to top

2.  Will this work hurt my horse?
Unlike some forms of chiropractic or drug therapy, this work is non-invasive and not traumatic. While there are some conditions that may not respond as well as others, it doesn't make problems worse.  Back to top

3.  Does this replace my Vet?
No. Your vet should be your first resource for resolving lameness issues. Although, since many vets are focused on their area of expertise, they may not be aware of the techniques or benefits of therapeutic bodywork. Ideally, Jeff works under a referral system, with your vet. Not all vets are willing to do that, but that is the preferred method.  Back to top

4.  How long do treatments last?

It depends. Acute (recent) injuries that are caused by a definable, physical mechanism of injury usually respond quickly, in one session. Long term (chronic) problems or problems caused by the stress of competition or poor handling sometimes take longer.  Back to top

5.  What conditions can't this work help?
Therapeutic bodywork can,t correct problems caused by disease, bone fractures, torn ligaments or tendons, behavior problems caused by poor handling or poor training. But, even with these problems, bodywork can make the horse more comfortable and allow the horse to direct more energy to healing the actual problem instead of overall pain management. It can also reduce the strain and tension on injured systems or allow the horse to be able to focus on what the trainer is asking.  Back to top

6.  Why is this better than a regular chiropractor, or massage therapist or acupuncturist?

The reason this work is so powerful is the synthesis of various disciplines. It allows us to work on many levels. The cause of imbalances is rarely on only one level. From the gross to the subtle, we can take care of poor shoeing, restore flexibility to the skeletal system, release muscle spasms and trigger points, then balance energy flow through acupressure. Each level interacts and supports all the other levels.  Back to top

7.  What if my horse won't tolerate being worked on?
One of the things most remarked on is how most horses relax into the session. Even high energy, nervous horses usually relax when they realize that this is helping to remove pain. Also, much of the work tends to release endorphins, the body's natural tranquilizers, which helps the relaxation response. Jeff's experience is that with the thousands of horses he has worked on, there were very few that didn't really like the session.  Back to top

8.  Are there any guarantees?
As with life, there are no guarantees, but if you would like to contact us using our Contact page, we can provide you with references to the type of results and the quality of work performed. Or see the Testimonials section of this site.  Back to top

9.  My horse isn't injured, is there any point in having him/her worked on?
Most musculoskeletal injuries and problems do not come out of the blue. They are what is known as cumulative strain injuries, meaning that a series of small strains tend to accumulate and build up until they show up as lameness or movement problems. Preventative bodywork, especially for performance horses, is one of the best ways to ensure soundness and prevent sudden surprises.  Back to top

10.  As a trainer, I can usually get my clients horses to do what I ask, why do I have any interest in bodywork?
While many trainers can push a horse to do things that may be uncomfortable for the horse, it is more a testament to the horse than the trainers overall awareness. A horse whose body is physically able to perform is usually more than mentally willing. From a practical point of view, comfortable horses are far faster and more efficient to train, thus maximizing the trainers effectiveness.  Back to top